Results tagged ‘ death ’

She don’t lie, she don’t lie, she don’t lie….Cocaine

joaquin andujar1

4 time All Star loved the yayo.

Joaquin Andujar, who famously supplied fellow teammates Lonnie Smith and Keith Hernandez with copious amounts of cocaine in the 80’s died recently on September 8th, 2015 at the age of 62. In memory of Andujar I’ve decided to pleasure you with some of the best quotes concerning the yayo that Eric Clapton famously crooned about in song. 

“If I have a near-beer, I’m near beer. And if I’m near beer, I’m close to tequila. And if I’m close to tequila, I’m adjacent to cocaine.” ― Craig Ferguson
“Happiness lies within one’s self, and the way to dig it out is cocaine.” ― Aleister Crowley, Diary of a Drug Fiend
“It’s not the side-effects of the cocaine – I’m thinking that it must be love. — David Bowie
“This original version of Coca-Cola contained a small amount of coca extract and therefore a trace of cocaine. (It was eliminated early in the twentieth century, though other extracts derived from coca leaves remain part of the drink to this day.) Its creation was not the accidental concoction of an amateur experimenting in his garden, but the deliberate and painstaking culmination of months of work by an experienced maker of quack remedies.” ― Tom Standage, A History of the World in 6 Glasses
“Until you’ve got your mouth full of cocaine, you don’t know what kissing is. One kiss goes on from phase to phase like one of those novels by Balzac and Zola and Romain Rolland and D. H. Lawrence and those chaps. And you never get tire. You’re on fourth speed all the time, and the engine purrs like a kitten, a big white kitten with the stars in its whiskers.” ― Aleister Crowley, Diary of a Drug Fiend
Cocaine is God’s way of saying you’re making too much money. –Robin Williams
(Cocaine) is neither moral nor immoral — it’s a chemical compound. The compound itself is not a menace to society until a human being treats it as if consumption bestowed a temporary license to act like an asshole. –Frank Zappa
If we could sniff or swallow something that would, for five or six hours each day, abolish our solitude as individuals, atone us with our fellows in a glowing exaltation of affection and make life in all its aspects seem not only worth living, but divinely beautiful and significant, and if this heavenly, world-transfiguring drug were of such a kind that we could wake up next morning with a clear head and an undamaged constitution — then, it seems to me, all our problems (and not merely the one small problem of discovering a novel pleasure) would be wholly solved and earth would become paradise. –Aldous Huxley

Brian Kingman talks about life after death.

Brian Kingman Oakland Athletics

Brian Kingman, your author.

 I recently e-mailed ex-Athletics pitcher Brian Kingman– informing him that the first player on the 1981 team that he had played for had passed. Kelvin Moore, who had played parts of 3 seasons in the majors had died on November 9th, 2014 from cardiac arrest. He was 57. 

Brian, being insightful and clever as always sent me back this interesting e-mail that ponders life after death and the infinite intricacies that perhaps may await us.  I hope C.C.A. readers enjoy this special, one of a kind look into a former ballplayers deepest, most personal thoughts: 

I am so very sorry to hear about Kelvin.
He was a great teammate – easy-going nice guy and powerful hitter.
What do you think happens when you die? 
 
 
The short answer of course is that no one knows. For all we know dying might be an awesome experience. Unfortunately no one has managed to report back from the dead to let us know. It remains a mystery. In fact you could say our entire existence is full of uncertainty. Man still debates the origins of our beginnings, questions the meaning of life, and has no knowledge of what happens after death.
 
 The Souls Search For Salvation aka Coping Mechanism
 
The fact that life is full of mysteries and unexplainable events, such as death, has been a source of angst since the beginning of time. What is a coping mechanism? It is a term used by psychologists

kelvin

R.I.P. Mr. Moore

to describe an adaptation to environmental stress that is based on conscious or unconscious choice, and that enhances control over behavior or gives psychological comfort. It has also been used by 20 game losers to make themselves believe that other people actually understand how they lost 20 games (trying to remember this is a baseball blog!)

 
The emergence of religion (some might say the invention of religion) gave Man an explanation for suffering, evil and the unknown in the world. It also gave man the hope for life after death. The essence of all religions are basically the same: A life does not begin at birth or end at death. Some religions believe in a Heaven or Hell, while others believe in reincarnation. Religion grew to become a huge part of an individuals life from birth to death, and helped to diminish the despair of meaninglessness.
 
With the advent of science many religious beliefs became mythology, and belief in God, which was the basis for meaning and value went into decline  his led to Nietzche’s famous quote: “God is dead”.  Cause of death? Indifference caused by a cultural shift away from faith, and towards science and rationalism. Beginning around the time of the Renaissance there was a major change in Man’s psychological evolution. By losing religion, modern man lost his connection with the afterlife.
“Life has no meaning the moment you lose the illusion of being eternal.”
    ~Jean Paul Sartre
 
But is it an illusion?
 
 Those who have had a near death experience have reported various things from feelings of warmth, serenity and detachment from the body, to the presence of a light at the end of a tunnel. Sounds very similar to what a baby goes through at birth. It leaves the only home it has known, and travels through a narrow tunnel towards a light. Perhaps after all, death is just a part of the cycle of life. I find life more satisfying living with the belief that we are eternal beings. It is so much more satisfying than what Shakespeare described in the early 1600’s when
he wrote these famous lines for his play Macbeth (Act 5, Scene 5):
 

Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time,
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.
 
 
Now that you have read the long answer, you learn it really is the same as the short answer. No one knows what happens when you die.
 
You have to die to find out!
 
Two buddies Bob and Earl were two of the biggest baseball fans in America. Their entire adult lives, Bob and Earl discussed baseball history in the winter, and they pored over every box score during the season.They went to 60 games a year. They even agreed that whoever died first would try to come back and tell the other if there was baseball in heaven.
 
One summer night, Bob passed away in his sleep after watching the Yankee victory earlier in the evening. He died happy. A few nights later, his buddy Earl awoke to the sound of Bob’s voice from beyond. “Bob is that you?” Earl asked. “Of course it me,” Bob replied.
“This is unbelievable!” Earl exclaimed. “So tell me, is there baseball in heaven?”
 
“Well I have some good news and some bad news for you. Which do you want to hear first?”  Earl excitedly replies, “Tell me the good news first.”
 
“Well, the good news is that yes there is baseball in heaven, Earl.”
 
“Oh, that is wonderful! So what could possibly be the bad news?”
 
“You’re pitching tomorrow night.”
 
 
 
 

Earl Williams R.I.P.

earl williams   With the recent passings of Stan Musial and Earl Weaver reminding us of our own mortality, Earl Williams’ death of leukemia on January 28th, 2013 went largely unnoticed. He was 64.

Intelligent and well spoken, Williams was one player who was never fearful of speaking his mind. It sometimes created problems for him; it sometimes created humor. His outspoken nature made him one of the more compelling characters of the 1970s. In 1977, Williams signed with the A’s, whose owner, Charlie Finley, loved to take flyers on big name veterans. By the time he joined the A’s, Williams had his weight problems under control, but was no less outspoken than he had been on his other teams. The A’s had an awful team; they were headed to a 98-loss season. Williams ripped into Oakland manager Bobby Winkles and his coaching staff, calling the level of coaching “nonexistent.” Winkles did not appreciate the sentiment. He told one reporter that if the young players on the A’s followed Williams’ lead, they would be “losers all their lives.”

Amazingly, Williams and Winkles survived the 1977 season. The following spring, Williams broke his thumb. And then, just before the start of the regular season, the A’s placed Williams on waivers. None of the other 25 teams showed interest in the veteran catcher/first baseman/DH.

Given that he was only 29 and still healthy enough to catch, Williams was shocked. So Williams, with the help of his mother, did something unprecedented for an out-of-work ballplayer. They took out an ad in The New York Times, offering his services to any major league team that might be looking for help.

The ad included the following message:

Salary: Very Reasonable
Excellent Health-No Police Record
Have Bat-Will Travel-Will Hustle

02Williams_2-popup

The part about having no police record underscored Williams’ sense of humor. But would anyone take the ad seriously? According to The Sporting News, one major league team did show interest. Desperate for a third-string catcher, the Expos sent Williams three wires (in the days before e-mail) and even left a phone message at his mother’s house. When Williams did not respond (for reasons that remain unknown), the Expos signed veteran Ed Herrmann instead.

Still, Williams didn’t quit. He ended up signing a contract to play in the Mexican League. He put in two seasons in Mexico before receiving an invitation from the Pirates to attend spring training in 1981. The Pirates seemed interested in having him as a backup catcher/first baseman, but he failed to make the team and rejected an opportunity to play for their Triple-A affiliate, the Portland Beavers. Williams opted to end his playing career.

I had not heard much about Williams since then, until reading a note on Facebook that he had passed away after being diagnosed with leukemia in July. Like many other fans, I was saddened to hear that he had died relatively young.